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FF402

Foam Trucks Aim To Help City Quash Car And Dumpster Fires, Reduce Cancer Risk

6 posts in this topic

Quote


BOSTON - The 23 fire engines set for their Boston debut this year will be equipped with a foam that can be powerfully effective in helping quash certain blazes and are intended to decrease the risk of cancer for city firefighters, officials said Tuesday.

 

Fire Commissioner Joseph E. Finn said that the foam will be used only on dumpster and vehicle blazes, which are most hazardous to firefighters health

 

 

FULL ARTICLE:

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/05/09/foam-trucks-aim-help-city-quash-car-dumpster-fires/R6CUIrcTSjuXUqiosrmBYP/story.html

Westfield12, FDNY 10-75 and x635 like this

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I assume by Commissioner Finn's comments that these engine will have roof/bumper or similar mounted foam guns? I'm not convinced foam handlines would provide much difference with regard to the proximity of the firefighters directing the stream. In fact the set up pictured in the story would require getting even closer than a standard water based stream? Also, with no disrespect to Commissioner Finn or any Boston Jakes, but the only reason dumpsters and car fires would be the most hazardous to firefighters health would be if said firefighters failed to use all their PPE, including SCBA. One can likely assume this was just a poorly constructed article using some of the easier points to lay out on why the new engines have foam systems.

dwcfireman and x635 like this

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Is this for real ?????????

x635 likes this

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I pondered this for a while, and I'm coming to the same conclusion as antiquefirlt.  Unless Boston ordered new engines with some sort of roof turret, they're still going to have to get up close and personal with the fire.  This doesn't change much other than the speed that the fire is smothered (not extinguished, as foam application doesn't necessarily mean the fire is out, rather it's suppressed efficiently enough to conduct rescue operations).

 

Dumpster fires and car fires are easily resolved with water.  I can understand with cars that the application of a class B foam will help in the event of an engine fire or fuel system fire, but the cost versus efficiency is not worth it.  Today's norm is to use AFFF or AFFF-AR, both of which are expensive and are designed for large class B fires, such as a burning pool of jet fuel or a tanker of ethanol that is on fire.

 

As for the picture associated with the article, it seems to be a stock photo of sorts that was used because the firefighters are using foam.  The applicator they are using on the nozzle is used for a higher expansion ration (more air agitation).  Quite honestly, the standard combination nozzle works great for foam application, as you can get extra froth with a fog pattern and the reach with the straight stream.

x635 likes this

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I wonder how good foam developed for smothering would do on a deep seated dumpster fire, when you have to soak way down deep.

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I'm wondering if this foam is actually F-500? F-500 has properties which can help reduce exposure.

 

Quote

Free radicals are unburned gases produced during the combustion process that turn into smoke and soot.  Inhibiting the chain reaction results in less smoke and toxins and increases visibility.

 

http://www.hct-world.com/products/chemical-agents/f-500-encapsulator-agent/

 

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