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PFDRes47cue

24 Cattle Killed After Tractor Trailer Carrying Them Flips

26 posts in this topic

This made me curious as to what department do to prepare for animals. I know that not all departments have farms, stables, ranches, etc in their response district but you just never know. It is not a bad idea to hold a class on how to maneuver, control, and tie up livestock.

PETA's now in the business of handing out "awards," and we've got a candidate for "Worst Truck Driver of the Year": the guy who flipped a tractor-trailer carrying nearly 40 cows this morning.

Phoenix New Times

As a result of the impact of the collision, 24 cattle were deceased inside the trailer, 13 survived.

AZ Department of Public Safety

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/04/01/20110401arizona-interstate-17-cattle-truck-rollover-abrk.html

Edited by xfirefighter484x
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Please......what type of training do you think is needed to rustle a wayward cow or steer found walking the highway after the truck that was carrying it flips over. How many CEUs could that be worth?

How do you become an instructor?

These are the type of incidents when you just have to use your brain and some luck.

JJB531 likes this

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Please......what type of training do you think is needed to rustle a wayward cow or steer found walking the highway after the truck that was carrying it flips over. How many CEUs could that be worth?

How do you become an instructor?

These are the type of incidents when you just have to use your brain and some luck.

Yes, steers walking on a roadway, are not very difficult to deal with but steers and livestock at fires can be. There actually are quite a few instructors/trainers that teach people how to tie up horses, cattle, etc to rescue them from fires or other disasters. Anyone who has ever battled a fire at a farm knows that it is quite hard to properly handle livestock that are scared. Their instinct is to return to the burning barn. Departments train their members on how to handle emergencies involving horse because without proper knowledge, the horse will win.

Edited by PFDRes47cue

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Dispatch the special operations trailer, pictured here:

post-4072-0-20747300-1301700277.jpg

couldnt agree anymore...dispatch mutal aid and hope its around dinner time....its a whole new meaning to the word speed beef

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...dispatch mutal aid and hope its around dinner time....

While its a nice thought to invite others. If you don't have the manpower to handle this incident, mutual aid is not the answer. You need more personnel....hire, recruit or merge with others.

INIT915 likes this

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I want to see some one go into a trailer load of lets say angus cows that has rolled over, and tie them up no less. Some body is getting injured if you have never been around cattle.

x129K likes this

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I want to see some one go into a trailer load of lets say angus cows that has rolled over, and tie them up no less. Some body is getting injured if you have never been around cattle.

EXACTLY! Hahahaaaa......"Not that hard" my a**!

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post-4072-0-76719800-1301750511.jpg

post-4072-0-51383100-1301750354.jpg

Edited by Bnechis

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This made me curious as to what department do to prepare for animals. I know that not all departments have farms, stables, ranches, etc in their response district but you just never know. It is not a bad idea to hold a class on how to maneuver, control, and tie up livestock.

How about agencies first become above proficient when it comes to properly treating and handling humans before we start worrying about livestock?

Just hook up with your local animal control officer if its that much of a concern? Or meet with one of the local farm owners for tips or just let them deal with their own livestock in the event of an incident.

Edited by JJB531

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How about agencies first become above proficient when it comes to properly treating and handling humans before we start worrying about livestock?

Just hook up with your local animal control officer if its that much of a concern? Or meet with one of the local farm owners for tips or just let them deal with their own livestock in the event of an incident.

I beleive the poster meant to secure the safety of the operating responders, and not to medically treat said critters.

As mentioned by the AFC Chief, bovine can become quite ornery under such circumstances. It would beHOOVE us to be prepared to ensure our own members safety.

Here is a link to a recent LODD of a Deputy Sheriff in Texas. He was killed by a cow.

http://www.odmp.org/officer/20796-deputy-sheriff-robert-britton

Also - where you find cattle, you will most likely NOT find a true animal control Officer, like found in urban areas..your very best bet for assistance is a VET or FARMERS!

Christ people, in this crazy world and all the crap we get exposed to havn't we learned to think outside fo the box and expect the unexpected...?

Edited by Bullseye

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I beleive the poster meant to secure the safety of the operating responders, and not to medically treat said critters.

As mentioned by the AFC Chief, bovine can become quite ornery under such circumstances. It would beHOOVE us to be prepared to ensure our own members safety.

Christ people, in this crazy world and all the crap we get exposed to havn't we learned to think outside fo the box and expect the unexpected...?

If you want to ensure the safety of the responders, don't enter the scene until these hazards are mitigated by someone who is accustomed to handling these animals, plain and simple.

Thinking outside the box is one thing, but attending a "bovine technician" class is pretty ridiculous if you ask me when we have numerous agencies that can't handle routine everyday requests for service.

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While its a nice thought to invite others. If you don't have the manpower to handle this incident, mutual aid is not the answer. You need more personnel....hire, recruit or merge with others.

what agencies around this area would u call... maybe go outside and call in someone from muscoot farm in somers to help with the handling of these animals?? (the living ones)

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If you want to ensure the safety of the responders, don't enter the scene until these hazards are mitigated by someone who is accustomed to handling these animals, plain and simple.

Thinking outside the box is one thing, but attending a "bovine technician" class is pretty ridiculous if you ask me when we have numerous agencies that can't handle routine everyday requests for service.

MANY of the local responders here in this area are local farmers, vets, and farmhands, and therefore familair with such critters and how to secure them. I understand not every area has this resource.

I made not mention of a class, just to be aware of the dangers.

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what agencies around this area would u call... maybe go outside and call in someone from muscoot farm in somers to help with the handling of these animals?? (the living ones)

Someone from one of the farms, your local animal control officer, some police departments carry tranquilizer guns to deal with aggressive dogs and/or wildlife. Those are some viable options, check with your local resources and see what's available.

Several years ago when NYPD ESU was tasked with removing an alligator and a tiger from a Harlem apartment, they received assistance from the Bronx zoo who supplied them with the appropriate sized darts and correct dose of ketaset to knock down these animals. The point that NJMedic was trying to make is that no one on scene there was a "tiger technician", but the job was handled safely and effectively by using common sense and calling in the appropriate resources.

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MANY of the local responders here in this area are local farmers, vets, and farmhands, and therefore familair with such critters and how to secure them. I understand not every area has this resource.

I made not mention of a class, just to be aware of the dangers.

I agree with you that responders should be aware of the dangers, and hopefully this is where common sense would kick in! The mention of a class was posted here by someone else, sorry to tie that into my response to your post.

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Someone from one of the farms, your local animal control officer, some police departments carry tranquilizer guns to deal with aggressive dogs and/or wildlife. Those are some viable options, check with your local resources and see what's available.

Several years ago when NYPD ESU was tasked with removing an alligator and a tiger from a Harlem apartment, they received assistance from the Bronx zoo who supplied them with the appropriate sized darts and correct dose of ketaset to knock down these animals. The point that NJMedic was trying to make is that no one on scene there was a "tiger technician", but the job was handled safely and effectively by using common sense and calling in the appropriate resources.

i see ur in putnam so im guessing u would give a ring to one of the local farmers out in PV or in another town to give u a hand? would u even consider asking for a rep from muscoot farm to come to the scene to give u a had depending on what part of putnam u are from??

Edited by MoFire390

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i see ur in putnam so im guessing u would give a ring to one of the local farmers out in PV or in another town to give u a hand? would u even consider asking for a rep from moscoot farm to come to the scene to give u a had depending on what part of putnam u are from??

I only live in Putnam, I don't work here, so I'm not intimately familiar with what's around up here. Muscoot in Somers, Green Chimneys in Brewster, Tilly Foster Farm in Brewster are a few that come immediately to mind. I know there are several more farms in Putnam/lower Dutchess County who could offer assistance.

Edited by JJB531

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Don't count on Muscoot. Not only do they not have anything that will help you wrangle the heard but with 3 farmers working there in a given day, they barely have time to avoid having to collect overtime every day let alone join you in parade of cattle wrestling. Your best bet is giving them a call, ask for Rick then see what he has to say. I guess is he would say good luck, laugh then hang up.

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Several years ago when NYPD ESU was tasked with removing an alligator and a tiger from a Harlem apartment, they received assistance from the Bronx zoo who supplied them with the appropriate sized darts and correct dose of ketaset to knock down these animals. The point that NJMedic was trying to make is that no one on scene there was a "tiger technician", but the job was handled safely and effectively by using common sense and calling in the appropriate resources.

post-4072-0-82690900-1301762889.jpg

NYPD "Tiger Technician"

PFDRes47cue likes this

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post-4072-0-82690900-1301762889.jpg

NYPD "Tiger Technician"

WOW!

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I witnessed a large horse trailer flip on 87 outside of Albany a few years back. It really wasn't a difficult scene. The animals that could flee did. Rescuers did their best to stay away from injured animals, and the fire chief had his communications center digging through the yellow pages for farm vets. About an hour later they had a couple on scene with drugs and harnesses and could begin lifting injured horses under the direction of the vets. NJMedic said it best. Use your head and hope the best. You'll never pre plan for every incident. Anyone here have cruise missile training? A dummy missile identical to the real thing fell on to 95 in the Bronx and the responders adapted to it.

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I own a New York State Tree Farm, you can call me for some help !

PFDRes47cue likes this

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the incident in NYC wasnt that where they found the 4 ft alligator in the bath tub??

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the incident in NYC wasnt that where they found the 4 ft alligator in the bath tub??

Same incident... The tiger, alligator, and human resident were all living harmoniously together in a Harlem apartment until the tiger took a chunk out of his owner.

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